SGU Episode 854

From SGUTranscripts
Jump to navigation Jump to search
  Emblem-pen-green.png This is a recent episode and it is not yet complete. Please help us complete the transcript as soon as possible by transcribing a section.
Add a Transcribing template to the top of this episode (and to your section) before you start so that we don't duplicate your efforts.
  Emblem-pen-orange.png This episode needs: transcription, formatting, links, 'Today I Learned' list, categories, segment redirects.
Please help out by contributing!
How to Contribute


You can use this outline to help structure the transcription. Click "Edit" above to begin.

SGU Episode 854
November 20th 2021
854 bionic limb.png
SGU 853 SGU 855
Skeptical Rogues
S: Steven Novella
B: Bob Novella
C: Cara Santa Maria
J: Jay Novella
E: Evan Bernstein
Guest
GH: George Grab, American musician & podcaster
Quote of the Week
Trust in science has a critical role to play with respect to increasing public support for science funding, enhancing science education, and separating trustworthy from untrustworthy sources. However, trust in science does not fix all evils and can create susceptibility to pseudoscience if trusting means not being critical.
Dolores Albarracín, American psychologist
Links
Download Podcast
Show Notes
Forum Topic

Introduction[edit]

Voice-over: You're listening to the Skeptics' Guide to the Universe, your escape to reality.

S: Hello and welcome to the Skeptics' Guide to the Universe. Today is Saturday, September 4, 2021, and this is your host, Steven Novella. (applause) Joining me this week are Bob Novella...

B: Hey, everybody!

S: Cara Santa Maria...

C: Howdy.

S: Jay Novella...

J: Hey, guys.

S: ...and Evan Bernstein.

E: Hello, everyone!

S: And, we have a special in-studio guest with us, George Hrab!

COVID-19 Update (6:59)[edit]

News Items[edit]

S:

B:

C:

J:

E:

(laughs) (laughter) (applause) [inaudible]

Kilometers-Long Spaceship (14:00)[edit]

Social Media and Kids (25:05)[edit]

Trust in Science (38:39)[edit]

Embryo Research (59:01)[edit]

Bionic Arms (1:08:25)[edit]

Quickie with Bob: Caves on Mars (1:15:00)[edit]

Mystery Quotes (1:18:27)[edit]

Science or Fiction (1:22:35)[edit]

Answer Item
Fiction yuzu largest culinary fruit
Science jabuticaba berries
Science pawpaw: rotting flesh, neurotoxic
Host Result
Steve win
Rogue Guess
Bob yuzu largest culinary fruit
Jay yuzu largest culinary fruit
George jabuticaba berries
Cara yuzu largest culinary fruit
Evan yuzu largest culinary fruit

Voice-over: It's time for Science or Fiction.

Theme: Fruit

Item #1: Jabuticaba berries, native to Brazil, are the size of plums but taste like grapes and grow directly on the trunk of the jabuticaba tree.[6]
Item #2: The pawpaw is a sought-after tropical fruit relative native to the eastern United States with flowers that smell like rotting flesh and fruit that contains a high concentration of neurotoxin.[7][8]
Item #3: The Yuzu is an Asian tree fruit that is the largest culinary fruit in the world, with long tubular fruit weighing over 80 pounds.[9]


Bob's Response[edit]

Jay's Response[edit]

George's Response[edit]

Cara's Response[edit]

Evan's Response[edit]

Listeners' Top Response[edit]

Steve Explains Item #1[edit]

Steve Explains Item #2[edit]

Steve Explains Item #3[edit]

Skeptical Quote of the Week (1:31:32)[edit]

Trust in science has a critical role to play with respect to increasing public support for science funding, enhancing science education and separating trustworthy from untrustworthy sources. However, trust in science does not fix all evils and can create susceptibility to pseudoscience if trusting means not being critical.
Dolores Albarracín, director of the Science of Science Communication Division and the Social Action Lab at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center.

Signoff/Announcements (1:33:30)[edit]

S: —and until next week, this is your Skeptics' Guide to the Universe.

S: Skeptics' Guide to the Universe is produced by SGU Productions, dedicated to promoting science and critical thinking. For more information, visit us at theskepticsguide.org. Send your questions to info@theskepticsguide.org. And, if you would like to support the show and all the work that we do, go to patreon.com/SkepticsGuide and consider becoming a patron and becoming part of the SGU community. Our listeners and supporters are what make SGU possible.

[top]


Today I Learned[edit]

  • Fact/Description, possibly with an article reference[10]
  • Fact/Description
  • Fact/Description

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

Vocabulary[edit]


Navi-previous.png Back to top of page Navi-next.png