SGU Episode 299

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SGU Episode 299
April 4th 2011
Pigasus.jpg
SGU 298 SGU 300
Skeptical Rogues
S: Steven Novella
R: Rebecca Watson
B: Bob Novella
J: Jay Novella
E: Evan Bernstein


Quote of the Week
'If an outsider perceives 'something wrong' with a core scientific model, the humble and justified response of that curious outsider should be to ask 'what mistake am I making?' before assuming 100% of the experts are wrong.'
David Brin
Links
Download Podcast
Show Notes
Forum Topic


Introduction[edit]

You're listening to the Skeptics' Guide to the Universe, your escape to reality.

This Day in Skepticism ()[edit]

  • April 9, 1959: NASA announced the selection of America's first seven astronauts for project Mercury. Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard and Donald Slayton were chosen from 110 applicants. Their training program at Langley, which ranged from a graduate-level course in introductory space science to simulator training and scuba-diving. Project Mercury, NASA's first high profile program, was an effort to learn if humans could survive in space. NASA required astronaut candidates to be male, not older than 40 years of age, not more than 5' 11' height and in excellent physical condition. On 5 May 1961, Shepard became the first American in space.

News Items ()[edit]

Pioneer Anomaly Solved? ()[edit]

Pigasus Awards ()[edit]

Wakefield and Somalis ()[edit]

Boy Genius Challenges Einstein ()[edit]

Who's That Noisy ()[edit]

  • Answer to last week: Phineas J. Woopie

Questions and Emails ()[edit]

Question #1 - Thorium Reactors ()[edit]

I've heard thorium reactors mentioned several times since the Fukushima disaster started unfolding. They're supposed to be safer, cleaner, cheaper, and easier to build than the uranium reactors in use today. And apparently they've been known about for decades. First of all, are these claims correct? Are there any hidden downsides that aren't being mentioned? Secondly, I've heard it claimed the only reason these reactors haven't been built is because they can't be used to create nuclear weapons. Is that true? Kinda depressing if it is. Here's a link to an article that makes these claims... http://realdoctorstu.com/2011/03/24/the-future-of-nuclear-power-after-fukushima-thorium-reactors/ Thanks guys, love the show! James Russell Australia

Science or Fiction ()[edit]

Item #1: When the Inuit were first discovered by European explorers, they believed that they were the only humans in existence. Item #2: John Tyler, the 10th president of the United States, born in 1790 - has two living grandsons. Item #3: The aboriginal Kuuk Thaayorre of northern Australia have no words for 'left' or 'right' but refer to all relative position in terms of north, south, east, and west.

Skeptical Quote of the Week ()[edit]

'If an outsider perceives 'something wrong' with a core scientific model, the humble and justified response of that curious outsider should be to ask 'what mistake am I making?' before assuming 100% of the experts are wrong.' - David Brin

Voiceover: The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe is produced by SGU productions, dedicated to promoting science and critical thinking. For more information on this and other episodes, please visit our website at www.theskepticsguide.org. You can also check out our other podcast the SGU 5x5 as well as find links to our blogs and the SGU forums. For questions, suggestions and other feedback please use the contact us form on the website or send an email to info@theskepticsguide.org. If you enjoyed this episode then please help us spread the word by leaving us a review on iTunes, Zune or your portal of choice.'Theorem' is performed by Kineto, and used with permission.

References[edit]


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